Curtains

Bubble Parking Medical Clinic / Yasue Imai

Bubble Parking Medical Clinic / Yasue Imai

© Yosuke Ohtake© Yosuke Ohtake© Yosuke Ohtake© Yosuke Ohtake+ 22


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned:
    43 m²

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:


    2020


  • Photographs Photographs: Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake

Text description provided by the architects. Who would have predicted that the spread of COVID-19 would drastically change our perception of the world, human existence and space in 2020? In the small clinic where my father works, it is difficult to keep the general outpatient clinic and the fever outpatient clinic in separate lines, and since the summer of 2020 my father has been worried about how to get through the winter without nosocomial infections. caused. by crown.

© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake

There are many possibilities for the situation surrounding medical facilities to evolve before COVID-19 comes to a complete stop, and in order to respond flexibly despite the small size of the facility, we have decided to set up a clinic. fever outpatient using 1.5 cars in the parking lot adjacent to the clinic.

© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake

All new materials are vinyl curtains. By using different transparencies, textures, lengths and details, a functional zoning is achieved. The curtains are easy to remove and their flatness reduces the need for daily disinfection and maintenance. The existing structure is a concrete structure which is over 50 years old and had a rough finish due to its use as a parking lot, but only in the renovated area, all floors, ceilings and walls are finished with a gloss coating so that they can be cleaned.

© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake

First, the patient and medical staff areas are completely airtight with clear vinyl walls. In a small clinic where one doctor and a few nurses can take care of all outpatients, it is very important to keep patients and medical staff away from each other. In such a small clinic where one doctor and a few nurses look after all outpatients, reducing the time it takes to put on and take off protective clothing is a big advantage.

© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake

Two curtains are placed in the patient area, and the whole area is divided into three main areas: the waiting area, the consultation area and the examination area. The curtains are all hung with curved rails in the shape of a semicircle, allowing the degree of opening and closing to be adjusted seamlessly. This greatly reduces the psychological stress on the patients who are surrounded by the curtains. In the waiting area, two benches with partitions and vinyl fabric backs are placed.

© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake

Curtains – Three different types of vinyl fabric, semi-milky fabric, opaque yellow fabric, and sheer blue fabric, were used. The overlapping blue-gray floor color brings soft color and light to the corner of the rugged parking lot, intuitively conveying to the street that the small 1.5-car space is being used as a space for people. The challenge of this project was to position the space as a billboard to send a message to the community as a family doctor in response to the unprecedented spread of the infection.

© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake

If the clinic is not equipped to deal with infectious diseases, the psychological burden not only for patients suspected of being infected, but also for those who visit the clinic for all other diseases, and most importantly, for the medical staff. , is immeasurable. Although the facilities are minimal, the visualization of this small development in the area connected to the roadway conveys the idea that the clinic is a place where people can consult in case of problems.

© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake

Now that we can hear the little sound of soap bubbles popping all over the world, the everyday space that is now within our grasp is full of information, fresh and easy to breathe. This design was born out of genuine concern and the proposal includes a light touch that allows anyone to easily return the space to its original parking spot without leaving a trace when it is no longer needed. As a designer, I hope that day will come soon.

© Yosuke Ohtake
© Yosuke Ohtake