Handicrafts

Tarun Tahiliani launches stunning new flagship store in Mumbai’s Dubash House

Thakur, who worked for six months perfecting the inner workings and appearance of the boutique, says luxury today is embodied in an abundance of time and space. Key to its design was the understanding that contemporaneity is defined by essentiality and functionality. “Modern and contemporary focus on what is needed. Take lighting for example, it is essential, not overdone. What needs to be lit, is,” she explains.

A passage connecting the couture and ready-to-wear sections displays mirrors, handicrafts and paintings. Entitled “Library of Time”, it is a showcase of traditional techniques such as embroidery alongside the potential of the latest technologies.

Thakur visited Tahiliani’s other stores to understand the brand in depth and map out what had been done before. “Tarun Tahiliani is growing rapidly as a brand – he wanted me to fully understand these things when designing,” she says, adding that their friendship over the decades has allowed it to be truly collaborative and free-flowing. of ideas.

A passage connecting the couture and ready-to-wear sections displays mirrors, handicrafts and paintings. Entitled “Library of Time”, it is a showcase of traditional techniques such as embroidery alongside the potential of the latest technologies. “Technology takes away some things, but it also opens up new worlds. You can produce with greater efficiency, making things more accessible,” notes Tahiliani.

Tahiliani says he wanted his new shop to “have a sense of belonging to Old Bombay.” He wandered around the neighborhood, admiring the Art Deco patterns – the patterns and work of the iron gratings – and thus was born an image of what the shop should look like.

Tahiliani’s favorite corner is located in the couture section, which is inspired by the luxury trunk salons of the past. This is where we discuss his vision for the future. The designer says he wants to bring the ideals of modern India to menswear, visualizing draped kurtas, waistcoats and even churidars. “The ‘Maharaja’ aesthetic is the world’s perception of our country, but this is a new India where we do so much with technology. We need a new narrative,” he says.

Read also : The ace designer Tarun Tahiliani celebrates the 25th anniversary of his label